It’s The Real Thing: Ocracoke

Posted July 5, 2021 – Narrated by Carmen
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Real islands don’t have bridges.

Ocracoke Island
Hatteras-Ocracoke Ferry ride

In mid-Spring, Living in Beauty’s ongoing search for alone time took us, by free vehicular ferry, to Ocracoke Island where it is still possible to camp in the dunes with a private path to the seashore and walk for hours in solitude on a natural beach.

Ocracoke Island

On The Outer Banks (OBX) of North Carolina – where the north-flowing Gulf Stream and south-flowing Labrador currents are constantly shifting the ocean floor around like two kids in a sandbox – shorelines, and even islands appear and disappear over night.

Ocracoke Island
On the ferry ride from Hatteras to Ocracoke

There, we found an adventurous place to test our dry-camping mettle and relax into an extravagant two-week island vacation.

For people from the American west, Ocracoke Island Campground on Cape Hattaras National Seashore is a once-in-a-lifetime (okay, maybe twice) camping experience.

Ocracoke Island
Pico loves the beach

Every day we had stories to tell … Dolphins feeding so close to shore we could reach out and touch them; big black snakes slithering across the path; a ghost crab visitation; anglers pulling gigantic catches right out of the surf; a wind gust that blew us backwards …

Ocracoke Island

Fortunately, there were plenty of cozy local establishments where friendly Ocracokers seemed delighted to listen to our wide-eyed tales while they packed our fresh local catch in ice or tapped us a beer.

But theirs is the story worth listening to.

Pirates

Countless shores along the Atlantic Coast lay claim to pirating history, but Ocracoke – Blackbeard’s lair – is the real thing and not a marketing scheme. Many Ocracokers can trace their history to the 1600’s to mid-1700’s when governors sheltered pirates for security and booty, and they have the delightful Ocracoke Brogue to prove it. Every Autumn the story is shared in a seriously historic and spectacular annual reenactment at Blackbeard’s Pirate Jamboree.

Ocracoke Island
Windfall II sails in Ocracoke Inlet beneath a skullen sky

Isolation

For centuries – that is, until the last couple of decades – this tight-knit community lived mostly isolated lives. In the old days, land lay between the island settlements of Hattaras and Ocracoke and people traveled back and forth. These remote communities on the fringe of America swelled with settlers from Jamestown and Williamsburg as desperate colonists escaped over-taxation and debt.

Ocracoke Island

But terrestrial jaunts between colonies changed on September 7, 1846, when a storm blew open a deep, wide inlet which became known as Hatteras Inlet and Ocracoke became entirely isolated.

Ocracoke Island

As a result, Ocracoker ingenuity and community is something to behold.

Ocracoke Island

Previously known as Pilot Town – for the old local specialty of navigating ships through the treacherous Pamlico Sound – Ocracokers also fish and hunt and perform sea rescue missions.

Ocracoke Island

In WWII, the tiny island was a top secret training base for amphibious warfare. The local skill of using salvage from shipwrecks to build and rebuild their homes and lives between devastating storms has earned them a formidable reputation as survivors.

Ocracoke Island

Until the 1950’s Ocracokers delivered each other’s babies, grew their own food and made their own medicines from local herbs. Even today, many locals prefer to stay home rather than travel away from the island.

Ocracoke Island

The cemeteries of Ocracoke also have a story to tell. With more than 80 family cemeteries, the dead outnumber the living population.

Spend some time here

Most of the island’s visitors are day-trippers. Perhaps the free ferry from Hatteras is to blame for that. Most first-timers are blasting through on a tour of the OBX and, unwittingly, knock Ocracoke off as a BTDT (been-there-done-that). Big mistake. You need at least a three-night stay to absorb the island culture and take in the fabulous beaches … We stayed for thirteen.

Ocracoke Island

True, the island is small enough to explore on a bicycle – most locals use bicycles and golf carts rather than cars – and, a stroll through the village can be accomplished in about thirty minutes. But it would be a shame to miss a single detail …

Magic Bean Coffee Bazaar, a good place to encounter the Ocracoke Brogue

The delicious local seafood and restaurants …

Boating, sailing and kayaking

Shelling …

and cycling on our Dolphin eBikes.

The reading and sunbathing isn’t bad either.

Ocracoke Island

Pico’s favorite activity is beach combing.

He rolled in so many things, that he went through his entire wardrobe.

Ocracoke Island

Beach walks were a daily adventure.

We really slowed down and got a sense of the island, it’s rhythm and landscape, and slowly I began imagining what it would be like to live, far, far away from it all …

Ocracoke Island

Back in the 1950’s, an over-ambitious marketer touted Ocracoke as the Bermuda of the U.S.A. Now, I’ve never been to Bermuda, but I’ve seen pictures and there is little resemblance. True, they are both islands with pinkish sand and occupy the same ocean and are located in the Hurricane Belt along the Gulf Stream, but they are not cut from tectonically equivalent cloth. Bermuda sits pretty on a limestone pedestal and Ocracoke Island is barely more than a shifting sandbar rising less than five feet above sea level and, according to coastal geographers, will be underwater before the turn of the next century.

Ocracoke Island
Various water level marks on The Village Craftsman

But the threat of sinking sand doesn’t hinder the real estate business on Ocracoke. From the prices, you’d think it was Bermuda.

Ocracoke Island

Figuring that my new favorite island wasn’t going to sink in my lifetime, I let down my defenses and fell in love with an old two-room over-water house known as The Fish House, built by Sam Jones. It has no plumbing for gas or water and no kitchen or bathroom. The asking price was in the $800,000’s.

Ocracoke Island

So, there ya go. For sailors, pirates sure do have a keen sense of real estate. You don’t need much to survive. Just some fresh water

Ocracoke Island

fresh fish …

a hiding place with ghost stories, ghost ships and ghostly places

and, a really good escape route.

Stock photo of Ocracoke’s Airport

Even though it didn’t work out for Blackbeard, I truly could live in Ocracoke. In almost five years of LIB, I’ve never felt more grief about pulling out of a place.

While browsing through The Village Craftsman

I broke my rule to take only photos and actually bought something.

Ocracoke Island
Hand carved wooden spoon and pie slicer

Part of the joy of keeping the LIB travel journal is re-living our experience. On occasion, when I am perusing notes and editing photos, I feel reconnected – almost transported back – so much so, that when I look out the window I expect to see the place I’m writing about.

Ocracoke Island

That’s how it is with Ocracoke Island.

Ocracoke Island

Now, I understand why people say they left their heart in … because my heart still feels kind of shipwrecked. Who knows how long it will take to get the Ocracoke out of my system?

Ocracoke Island

Perhaps my senses were heightened.

Being on a sandbar twenty miles out in the Atlantic Ocean for two weeks is an efficient reminder of one’s vulnerability.

Ocracoke Island

Regardless of the voyage by ferry, LIB was, in truth, just something that washed ashore during two weeks of shoulder season. And, if given a chance, that pristine natural environment would have been proud to use us as a sandbag until we turned up as salvage for some Ocracoker’s snazzy She Shack.

Ocracoke Island

Even on the drive there, we were picking up on the signs and signals – right from when we learned that we had to go 350 miles out of our way to catch a different ferry because the one we had reservations for had broken steerage and right up to twilight when we finally arrived to the campground – that, without a boat or an airplane, we must rely on every ounce of fortitude and smarts we’ve accumulated from living outdoors over the last five years.

I’m not being fanciful here or making an overstatement of any kind. When traveling through The Outer Banks, the gorgeous natural beauty, the national park service and the tourism industry is no insurance policy or guarantee of safety.

Ocracoke Island

Fact is, real adventure has teeth.

Ocracoke Island

And, Ocracoke offers no artificiality, pretense, or groundless assurances. So we were constantly following current reports, monitoring tides, scanning for alerts about incoming storms and rip currents. And, when we drove out of Hattaras Island, past the seepage and sandbags, we were grateful we hadn’t experienced more dangerous wet conditions and realized we probably should have arrived with a multi-structured evacuation plan.

Ocracoke Island

“Choose your natural disaster and prepare for it,” is an important motto for any traveler. But after being trapped in a heat dome in California, cornered by wildfires in Canada, in a race with a tornado in Kansas and evacuated by two consecutive hurricanes in South Carolina, Ocracoke was a piece of cake.

Ocracoke Island

The pure joy and surprise of feeling a kinship with Ocracoke Island still follows us. Calculating that gut-wrenching loss from the local point of view must be incredibly difficult. So, we pray that their magical island remains as it is for generations to come. Because Ocracoke is something different, something apart, something miraculous.

Ocracoke Island

It is a gift from the sea.

If you want to see our exact route, click here.

*photos in this post (unless otherwise noted) were taken and copyrighted by Living In Beauty.


66 thoughts on “It’s The Real Thing: Ocracoke

  1. My favorite post yet. We took my mom and rented a house on Ocracoke 15 years ago and doesn’t sound like it has changed much. Thank heavens

    1. Hey Kathy! Thank you for sharing. We observed some new construction due to recovery from Hurricane Michael, but evidently, most of those sturdy old Ocracoker constructions hold up well.

      House rental is a good way to visit Ocracoke. There are several lovely guest-houses and B&B’s. But be aware … some, I hear, are well-known to be haunted by ghosts.

      https://www.villagecraftsmen.com/mrs-godfreys-ghost/

      Thank you so much for being with us, Kathy.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  2. We spent a week at Ocracoke each summer 7 years in a row. Missed a few years, as the kids were tied up w/ school-related activities that stretched across summer. Go back again last year, and will be there later this month. One of our favorite places.

    1. Hey Leslie!

      You are true regular! We met many of them who were having their annual visit just before the summer crowds after Memorial Day.

      I met a North Carolina woman on the beach who says Ocracoke is her birthday treat every year since she was a teen. She was in her 60’s. It seems there are two Ocracoke communities – those who live there and those who wish they lived there.

      Thanks so much for sharing.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      LIB

    1. Ours too! It’s our first time to be able to say that.

      Thanks for sharing!

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      LIB

  3. This was one of your most beautiful posts! You conveyed, through your glorious words, your new found love of this place. When you were sorrowful at leaving it behind, I had tears as well. Thank you for sharing your journey. I have been silently following you for years since you left Coronado (we live in Bird Rock) but could not stay quiet after reading this. TY!

    1. Thank you for your tears – an appropriate expression for a salty paradise. Now Ocracoke is yours as well. Thanks so much for looking after us for all this years with your good energy and good will.

      Best to you and yours, Laurenne, and …

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

    1. Hey Larry! xoxo and more xoxo for Jacquie!

      We’d love to! And, maybe we should plan a vacay together.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  4. A definite favorite. Did you find out how many people actually call the Island their home all year round?

    1. Wonderful to hear from you Barbara!

      Good catch. I found conflicting numbers, so I decided not to guess – but since you mention it, here I go … definitely under a thousand and probably more like 700? They have a school which looked new since Hurricane Dorian and a very good water facility, fire department, coast guard station, airport, NP rangers … Of course the population swells in the summer with season-only residents.

      The weeks before Memorial Day are a good time to visit. The residents of the vacation houses hadn’t arrived and some of the restaurants, ice-cream shops and gift stores weren’t open yet.

      In May there is a fascinating event that is open to public at the British Cemetery, but we missed it.

      https://ocracokeobserver.com/2019/05/06/the-british-cemetery-ceremony-set-for-friday/

      But, if we get a “next time in Okracoke” I think it would be in October for the Pirate Jamboree.

      BTW, I also forgot to mention that there is a private, full-service RV Park on the island. So FYI: Teeter’s Campground: http://www.teeterscampground.com

      Thanks so much for being with us, Barbara!

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  5. Sounds wonderful! We had plans to go there from Kitty Hawk but after storm devastated area a few years ago the ferry was only taking locals and construction workers. You’ve inspired me to go back to OBX!

    1. Hey Denise!

      Yes! It’s good to have an alternative plan or two when visiting OBX. We were almost stranded … well, actually, there were four days of our stay when the south was closed and a few hours when the north was also closed off. The interruption in ferry services was due to the need for dredging.

      I hope you have a chance to go again and the timing works for you.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  6. The whole region was closed down two years ago after flooding from a hurricane devastated the area. We didn’t get to visit there or the Outer Banks. Maybe next year…

    1. Yes, Tammy, it’s like the last stop before the whole world dissolves into the sky and you just want the moment to last forever.

      Thanks for sharing.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  7. What a wonderful journey. I have not seen your post in a while due to work and mitigating circumstances, so I thoroughly enjoyed this living in beauty and all it had to offer. The island was enchanting and the food looked fabulous 💋. Looking forward to more adventures 🎆

    1. Hello again Teresa! We did miss you … but you are Back!

      Sounds like you may be coming out of a difficult place and we hope that all is currently well with you.

      Much as we tried, we were not talented enough to capture even a small dose of the magic, but we are delighted that you were enchanted. Thank you for enjoying Ocracoke with us.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  8. Wow! Ocracoke certainly invoked your imagination! Excellent writing! Thanks for sharing. The photo of the green, churning waves just knocked my socks off!
    (I still have a book for you. One of these days we will cross paths.)

    1. Hey Jo! Always wonderful to hear from you!

      You are like me. I have about 100 photos of that water. I don’t know why but my favorite activity is standing out in the surf and taking photos of waves … I guess I’m a wave nerd.

      Thanks for your encouragement. Yes, I need to read your book and you need to see ALL of my wave photos 🙂

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  9. What a beautiful and heartfelt post! Your words made me feel that I should drop what I’m doing and drive 11 plus hours so I could explore this area myself. Upon floating back to reality (within a few seconds ), I realized what I will do instead is to put this location on my ever-growing list of must-sees. Thank you for sharing.

    1. Kathy, you are most welcome. Someday, if you find the time to go to Ocracoke, be sure to include Hattaras and Nags Head as well. We were only able to blast through those two OBX islands and wish we’d planned better … Next time.

      Thank you for being with us, Kathy. You are an encouragement.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  10. Kind of like where we are volunteering at St Joseph Peninsula State Park on Cape San Blas, Fl.but with more shops and amenities. We can literally walk from gulf to bay in under 10 minutes. Very good seafood and a @ 10 mile bike trail. Our 2002 Airstream Classic 28 is named , “Shiny Dancer”.

    1. Hey Regis & Cindy! We were on Saint Joseph Peninsula last winter. Love Cape San Blas and the whole area – even rode the entire bike trail which was fabulous.

      So wonderful to have you with us!

      Safe and Happy Travels with Shiny Dancer!

      Carmen@LIB

  11. Stunning photos! Thank you for sharing. I have a new place to add to my most go list either. Y camper or rental!

    1. Hey Jenn! We are happy to share.

      When you go, hang a shell on a fence post for me.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  12. Carmen & Jim,
    Long time since I’ve connected with you guys, but have been watching your adventures.
    Neuman here.
    I’m glad to see your east coast adventures that I have enjoyed over the years with my Althea (our AS escape pod)
    are now some of your favs.
    (The Keys, Saint Augustine, coastal SC, Nickerson Cape Cod and now Ocracoke)
    Ocracoke is one of my favorite gems.
    I used to have annual week long deep sea fishing trips to Hatteras with excursions to Ocracoke.
    I’ve dreamed of an extended stay at the ocean under the stars on that lost island.
    Being miles out at sea on a spit of sand is not for everyone, which is fine with me. Less popular, the better is how I roll. Places like that seem more genuine. You guys understand it.

    Enjoy the journey !!!
    Cheers !!!
    Neuman.

    1. Hey Neuman! It’s been quite a journey and you’ve been with us since we started out in 2016. It’s just so great to hear from you and we hope all is well with you and yours.

      Because of your sharing, we have visited Assateague Island, Nickerson and Anastasia and we can’t thank you enough.

      Yes, our favorite places seem to have few services and amenities … Anza-Borrego, Big Bend, Highway 50 in Nevada, South Padre Island, Winnemucca, Fish Lake in Utah … Nature is more profound in remote areas … it peaks the senses and makes one feel like a a participant in a great mystery.

      I love your Airstream’s name, Althea. It means “healing” right?

      Again, thanks SO much for being with us, and for checking in and sharing in the joy of adventure.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

    1. It’s always lovely to hear from our SoCal friends Mark and Connie!

      Our little security professional had his 13th birthday last May. This full-time travel keeps us all very close – like the three musketeers. We sure do love the lil’ nipper. Beaches are his favorite place and we enjoy treating him IF he doesn’t EAT SAND! He gets excited and runs like a wild dog, kicks up his back legs and then dips his mouth into the soft warm sand and gulps down a poisonous mouthful. Then, we sit with him all night rubbing his belly while he cries and moans. Just a single bite of sand really messes him up. We hate to muzzle him on his beach walks, but as he ages, we will probably have to. But other than eating sand (oh, and biting all of our friends) he’s quite sane, healthy and happy. Best watch dog we’ve ever had. If he doesn’t eat sand and die, he could live as long as Miss Winnie who almost made it to her 20th birthday and Miss Ivie who lived to 18 years-old. Keeping our fingers crossed.

      Best to you two in your Safe and Happy Airstream travels!

      Carmen@LIB

    1. Errol and Wendy! Please, take me with you!!!

      xoxo,

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

    1. Hey Domenic! And, the other four are …? 🙂

      Thanks so much for being with us!

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

      1. Assateague Island MD. Cavendish National Park, Prince Edward Island Canada. Sable Beach, Ontario Canada. Arcadia National Park, Maine. 😉

        1. Thank you, Domenic! We recently visited Assateague (WOW!) … 35 years ago we rode our bicycles around PEI, but we want to get back there. We had planned to be there this year, but it will have to wait. We visited Acadia two summers ago … Spectacular! We hope to visit Queen Elizabeth II Wildlands Provincial Park in Ontario sometime in the future … I think we could travel like this for ten years and still not see it all!

  13. This is perhaps the most beautiful, enticing post you have done yet, and many others were still terrific. The photos, the narrative…it all makes me want to walk in your footsteps!

    1. Hey Ted!

      We miss you two! We must find a way to meet up.

      Yes, the more we travel, the more we want to travel – and the more we see, the more reasonable it seems to continue as we are until we must stop. Mobility Sweet Mobility 🙂

      Much love to you and Marcy and Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

    1. Hey Dean! We’re happy to share. If you ever have a question about an area we’ve visited, feel free to contact us for more info.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  14. Beautifully done! Enjoyed meeting you on Okracoke during my all-too-brief visit there. But, I will definitely be going back! Happy trails!

    1. Hey Carl!

      You pulled out before we could get a photo … just woke up and you were gone like a vanishing OBX sandbar.

      Thank you for reaching out and sharing your story about how one day you got the itch to travel, outfitted, and hit the road for how many years now…? Life should be an adventure and yours is all that.

      Yes, someday we’ll be back in Ocracoke, too. Maybe you will be there … and maybe we will invite you to our overwater Fish House 😉 for a sunset dinner on the inlet and talk travel and kayaking.

      Safe and Happy Travels, Carl – and thank you for being a part of our LIB life.

      Carmen@LIB

  15. Sounds like a place Ronnie and I need to visit – for at least 3 days! Probably stay 10 with our bikes!

    1. Hey Joe! I think you and Ronnie would love it and have the skills to appreciate the risks. Yes, in almost every place in OBX, bicycles are all you need. Parking, especially in Ocracoke, is minimal. The restaurants surprised us. We weren’t expecting to eat out. Sorella’s was especially good. Fortunately, we didn’t stock up too heavily on provisions. There is a little grocery store in town that had most of what we needed – if not one day, then the next. Miss you two. Hope all is well.

      Bon camping and Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  16. What a cool place to go! Great post and wonderful pictures. Since you were dry camping there for two weeks I have to ask, was there a place to dump? Get water?

    1. Hey Steve! Great to hear from you! Are you going to Alumapalooza this year?

      Yes. A dump station and potable water is available at the NP campground – about a one-minute drive. There are showers too, but they are not heated. Toilets are available but we never used them. Services are minimal, but the site was level and the sites along the dunes are the prime.

      Teeter’s Campground in town has full hook-ups, but it isn’t on the beach – though the sea is never far away – especially on bicycles. But we loved the solitude of the beach and the sound of the waves at night. And the bike ride to town on the safe, nicely paved designated bike trail was always a treat.

      Hope you and Sue get a chance to experience Ocracoke!

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

      1. We will not be able to make Alumapalooza this year. Still getting settled in our new home in AZ. Maybe next… We are traveling to JC though mid Sept. for our final warranty visit. Looking forward to the trip and seeing Artie and the team there.

  17. Absolutely amazing. You guys are an inspiration. Love your set up, love your thoughts on life and quite simply thing what you guys are doing is amazing. We are not full timers, but we are heavy duty part timers, and are heading out again tomorrow. May your travels always be fun, special and safe.

    1. Thank you for the encouragement. We’re just wandering around and sometimes we get lucky, sometimes very lucky, and sometimes extremely lucky. We love it all – even bad weather is a better alternative than boredom. Enjoy your heavy duty excursion! And, if you are inclined to share, please let us know if there is a place we should see.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  18. My husband and I love visiting Ocracoke. Although, we camp our Airstream in Rodanthe, we have been taking the ferry there for many years. Such a beautiful place!

  19. Carmen and Jim,
    Thanks for capturing the beauty, charm and spirit of our beautiful little piece of Heaven on Earth. We live on the Island 7 months a year, (October-May). It is the most peaceful time to spend there and a good time to be away from harsh Buffalo winters. We had been vacationing on the Island since the early 70’s, whenever possible. In 2013 we purchased a place of our own, fulfilling a life long dream. As the ferry approaches the dock, the stress flows from our bodies and Island life begins. I am so glad you guys got to experience it for yourselves and share it with others. Thanks again for sharing!
    Vinnie

    1. Hey Vinnie!

      Yes! That feeling when you drive off the ferry onto the island having accomplished a successful escape from the rancor of civilization … I’m struggling for a word to describe that feeling. All I can come up with is, “Whew!”

      Recently, in Kentuck Knob, PA, we met some wonderful folks from Buffalo. We need to get up there and check it out.

      Thanks so much for describing your Ocracoke experience.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  20. When we lived on the East Coast, this was our very favorite place to vacation. We can’t wait to go back. Love – Love – Love it there!!!

    1. Hey Donna!

      Most people from the west coast would probably have no idea about the OBX or Ocracoke Island. When we need a beach vacation we feel lucky to have Baja Mexico and Catalina … but for the wide open beaches and just sheer beauty, the OBX shorelines are our new favorite environment.

      Thanks so much for sharing.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      LIB

  21. This is a lovely article, and I think you very well capture the magic of Ocracoke. Two things, though. Jason’s is maybe the best food in the island, gotta give it a shout out. And you misspelled “Eduardo’s” which coincidentally has perhaps the best breakfast anywhere

    1. Hey Dima! Thank you for the encouraging words and helpful comments.

      Jason’s had not opened while we were there. We arrived shortly before Spring Break and left about a week and a half after. Having dinner at Jason’s is just another reason why we need to go back to our favorite island, Ocracoke.

      Thanks for the catch about the spelling of Eduardo’s. The correction has been updated. We hadn’t thought about having breakfast at Eduardo’s but what a great idea! How’s the coffee?

      Thank you, Dima, for being with us.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  22. Excellent and beautiful article! You might find it interesting to know that for the last 7 years in a row I and my buddy Mike Rooney lead a number of professional artists to Ocracoke for a week of plein air painting. Always a good time! Beautiful place to paint! Will be back again this year, October 16 – 23

    1. Hey Dan! What a fabulous place to paint – every inch of the island is beautiful but I especially loved the hammock. You might want to visit in early Spring. The crowds are low and the bloom was quite unexpected with heirloom roses, azalea, wild wisteria and seeding grasses.

      Thanks so much for being here.

      Safe Travels and Happy Painting!

      Carmen@LIB

  23. I live just north of there in Nags Head and my mom is just on the mainland side where the ferry docks from Ocracoke. Eduardo’s is awesome!

    1. Yer killin’ me, Jenny. But I sincerly thank you for sharing. Please stick a conch shell on a fence post for me. I’ll be back.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

  24. love it! We have camped at Ocracoke every October for the last 12 years. This year will be the first time we will camp at the Nat. Park Campground. I have been wondering exactly what my site is like and so happens your site was right next to where our will be. It is the one with the small camper next to yours in the drone video. Thanks for the great view of where we will be – now you have just really ramped up our excitement!

    1. We’re envious Ralph (Pico, especially). We hope to be in Ocracoke again for the Pirate Jamboree (maybe 2023). Have a wonderful time in almost-our-campsite. Enjoy the Ghost Crab visitations – SO adorable – like little Disney creatures.

      Safe and Happy Travels!

      Carmen@LIB

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